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« This Week in 3-D: Hot Babes and Moon Rocks! | Main | Up Close and Personal with the Neo1973 »

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Comments

William Zych

When secounds count waiting for the last person to board the coaster could mean life or death for all! There should be an individual system for each member to escape allowing the maximum safety margin. The slide may be slower but could allow most of the crew to escape, or distance themselves, before a disaster could take them all.
They could also have considered individual paragliders, they would afford individuality, safe landings, and distance.

William H. Zych

In the Marines we trained in Korea with the ROK Marines at their mountain warfare training area. They had what we called the slide for life. Basically it was a steel cable with a pulley that we slid from one mountaintop to the next. That was very simple, effective, wouldnt cost much, and very fast. The crew could just walk up, hook one snap link, jump, and be clear of danger in about 5 secounds!

Dumb

Kelly Humpries was lying. They chose the rollercoaster months ago.

MikeD

The shots show the escape vehicle going parallel to the launch vehicle. It would seem from an engineering and safety standpoint, that it should be perpendicular and shieded by the launch gantry. The gantry should also be shielded more heavily against blasts. The vehicles should be 'blast-shot' like ejection seats. There is no time to wait for gravity!

Today's news says the Shuttle fuel tank foam was damaged by hail. I'm no scientist, but shouldn't it be shielded by fiberglass, carbon fiber, or thin steel? That would protect it from hail, woodpeckers, and the peel-off that kills people. What does it take to wise-up? 20 people dead? $200 million in cost?

I am extremely angry as a human, a father, and lastly as a taxpayer.

MikeD

The shots show the escape vehicle going parallel to the launch vehicle. It would seem from an engineering and safety standpoint, that it should be perpendicular and shieded by the launch gantry. The gantry should also be shielded more heavily against blasts. The vehicles should be 'blast-shot' like ejection seats. There is no time to wait for gravity!

Today's news says the Shuttle fuel tank foam was damaged by hail. I'm no scientist, but shouldn't it be shielded by fiberglass, carbon fiber, or thin steel? That would protect it from hail, woodpeckers, and the peel-off that kills people. What does it take to wise-up? 20 people dead? $200 million in cost?

I am extremely angry as a human, a father, and lastly as a taxpayer.

Health News

I can't believe how much of this I just wasn't aware of. Thank you for bringing more information to this topic for me. I'm truly grateful and really impressed.

download microsoft software

3Nt9Xl Stupid article..!!

The comments to this entry are closed.

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